Too much yellow?

black-eyed susansMy second-grade neighbors told me yesterday that there’s too much yellow right now. Here and in the neighborhood, where I have certainly shared the wealth of black-eyed Susans. This is part of our front yard right now. What do you think?

I like that we should have color for the better part of two months. What other perennial can give you that?

My fall replanting plans include creating wedges in the mass of black-eyed Susans and spreading out day lillies that can then create clumps over the years. I also want to move some red crocosmia that bloomed at the same time as lilac bee balm to create another clump and to spread out the color and height.

Advertisements

More from the vegetable beds

Our test of growing zucchini is a tomato cage seems to be a success. We’ve already gotten more this year than in the past, so keeping the leaves off the ground seems like the way to go (though I am wondering if bugs have since gotten to the more prolific one — note to self for next year: keep plants in separate beds to prevent bugs from hopping from one to the next).

These photos are about 10 days old:

zucchin1 2017

I failed at keeping one really well contained in the cage, though the sprawl seems to be less than in years past. Regardless, it’s ginormous.

Next year we’ll try with cages upside down to see if that helps better contain the early sprawl and then just let them spread out after a rung or two.

zucchini2 2017The tomatoes are doing fine, though I am concerned about the number of dead leaves near the bottom on so many. We’ve had plenty of rain this year, but it tends to be in short, heavy bursts, rather than a slow soak, so maybe the plants aren’t getting as much water as I think. Or maybe we’ve got a case of something else?

The first Brandywine from our Mississippi plants was this deep red and so tasty with basil from the garden (and mozzarella from the store):

tomato caprese 2017

The glut is starting

vegetable harvest july 21 2017To sum it up briefly: We can’t keep up with the zucchini. Too hot to do much baking! When we’ve had enough of kale salad, the greens are becoming pesto. There’s been more than enough for that. This evening marked our first harvest of beans, and the Sungold tomatoes are kicking off the tomato season. We harvested the first two three days ago and have had a few more since then. At least we’ll soon be able to use up cucumbers by making gazpacho.

The next debate for the garden: what to plant where the peas have been? A fall crop of peas? Try again with beets? Find a zucchini plant in the clearance section at a garden center and have a fall crop?

Feel free to weigh in.

3 colors of beans

three colors of beans

Fun!

Purple, yellow and traditional green — this is why I bought that packet of bean seeds back in early May. Though the purple ones in particular lose their color pretty quickly. I’ll stick to 20 seconds in the microwave and leave a lot of crunch.

We will need to work at keeping up with the vegetables from the garden — that or have a party and cook for lots of people. We still have plenty of kale, though the salad greens are starting to bolt. And then there’s the output from this year’s three zucchini plants: we seem to get at least one zucchini a day. What to do with all of those? Add to stir fry, spiralize into noodles, make chocolate zucchini cake — or? Otherwise I will just have to freeze for winter baking). Perhaps the zucchini and beans are feeding off each other in a two-sister variation of the three-sister plantings (corn, beans and squash) that Native Americans favored.

The tomatoes have yet to ripen, though at least we can see fruit  (yes, I’m jealous, Izzy).

This was Saturday’s harvest:

saturday harvest july 2016

including more of those beans, plus some basil:

saturday beans and basil

A pop of summer color

When I looked out the kitchen window this time last year, I knew what was missing: color in the backyard flower bed.

Not this year.

The bold red of these crocosmia flowers are visible. Yes! All the more impressive since the flowers themselves are maybe 2 inches. (I’ve been spreading them out from their initial spot at the corner of the house; should I do more?) They also pair really nicely with the yellow flowers in a shrub that anchors one end of the bed. Which the bees were all over tonight.

red pop in backyard july 2016