Tackling our zucchini glut (it’s a struggle)

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These got out of hand…

In previous years, I’ve complained about how our zucchini plants give up and die after producing only a handful of vegetables.

Not this year.

We came home after not even a week away to four XXXL zucchini, each give or take 4 pounds. Since then, I have found one more mega squash hiding under the leaves and have harvested many more regular ones that are perfect for grilling or spiralizing.

I’m still going through the XXXL ones, though. They can be turned into an awesome, super-moist chocolate zucchini cake, and you wouldn’t know there was zucchini if I didn’t tell you (I like to tweak it with lots of ginger plus fresh cranberries that were stashed in the freezer around Thanksgiving). It’s been so hot, though, that I haven’t wanted to turn on the oven much. No excuse for not grating them all and freezing them, though.

I don’t have the recipe handy right now and can’t find it online, but I’ll post it in an update.

The bigger question is why has this year been so much better. More rain? More heat? That we used upside-down tomato cages to get them to grow upward first, before they started sprawling? Did any of that keep the bugs away? Or the steady stream of eggshells I crushed and dropped around them?

Finally, zucchini plants are heavy feeders, and this year I was determined to give them some nutrients. We had perhaps 11/2 bottles of Terra Cycle’s worm poop that a Master Gardener neighbor had given me a few years back that I would repeatedly forget about until it was really late in the season. This year I was determined to use it all up … and I have. Is that the reason?

9BA8AD47-7522-4A3D-8883-16CB96490A03To be fair, I have not used this natural fertilizer on our cucumber plants, which have been way too prolific for my taste. We came back from that same vacation to 10 cukes. I gave a bunch to neighbors. Maybe two weeks later I gave away another dozen…

Oh, and then there is the rhubarb. We have the green kind. We’ve been better about harvesting it this year, though unfortunately we have been less successful about pairing it with strawberries in something yummy, like pie. Good thing there’s a freezer.

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Fourth of July tomatoes — yes!

Is this the earliest yet for us? Five Sungold tomatoes harvested on the Fourth of July.

I admit they aren’t as uniformly golden as ones we will harvest later on. But wow were they good!

We’ve also been harvesting cucumber, peas, arugula and basil, but it’s the tomatoes I’m most excited about.

Here’s what the tomato bed looks like:

tomato plants july 4 2018

 

Ah, garlic scapes

0F4B6E9F-260A-4D1C-8DED-F4624BA9BA46I harvested 34 garlic scapes earlier this week and just added another two that I’d overlooked.

I’m now looking for ideas beyond garlic scape pesto. What should I cook? Any suggestions?

I admit I’m mostly hoping for fat garlic bulbs when I harvest in a month or two. Probably closer to two given how weird the weather has been.

 

Leeks, and a resolution for next year

IMG_1395(How did this not get published when I wrote it in November??))

The leeks we bought in Maine in June have been amazing!

No work, most did really well (and I will take the blame for those that didn’t, because they ended up having to fight with tomatoes). I don’t know that we have ever had some this thick and with this much white.

Next year I will call the place in late May/early June (unless we find ourselves headed to Maine) and mail-order a flat of 72 or whatever it takes. At 16 cents a plug, and a healthy one, not like a hair strand, is there a better deal? I’m sure we can find room in the beds. Even at the expense of tomatoes– famous last words! (Kale could shrink first?) And if you want to be part of my order, speak up.

Here are some other late harvests: a mixing bowl of hot peppers (guess I better freeze some) and lemongrass headed for a pot to overwinter (will see how freezing some stalks works out).

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See what vegetable in our garden survived the winter

92331542-26ED-4E80-AD9D-1A56C5993EF2Back a few months ago, when it was regularly falling well below freezing, I decided to try to save some kale that was still growing in one of our raised beds. I knew kale was hardy, but just how hardy? I pulled out some old sheets to create an ad hoc row cover. It rained, then snowed and snowed some more. The wet sheets stayed in place for about three months, as much out of inertia as any snow cover that would disappear within a few days.

Finally, as the calendar (if not the weather) turned to spring, I pulled off the covers.

Most of the kale stalks had rotted. But to my surprise, some were showing little shoots of green leaves. Now that I’ve given them more time and light, they’ve gone even greener. Time to start eating from the garden again (or adding this to my favorite Instant Pot recipe of the moment, Melissa Clark’s Moroccan Chickpeas with Kale.)

More from the vegetable beds

Our test of growing zucchini is a tomato cage seems to be a success. We’ve already gotten more this year than in the past, so keeping the leaves off the ground seems like the way to go (though I am wondering if bugs have since gotten to the more prolific one — note to self for next year: keep plants in separate beds to prevent bugs from hopping from one to the next).

These photos are about 10 days old:

zucchin1 2017

I failed at keeping one really well contained in the cage, though the sprawl seems to be less than in years past. Regardless, it’s ginormous.

Next year we’ll try with cages upside down to see if that helps better contain the early sprawl and then just let them spread out after a rung or two.

zucchini2 2017The tomatoes are doing fine, though I am concerned about the number of dead leaves near the bottom on so many. We’ve had plenty of rain this year, but it tends to be in short, heavy bursts, rather than a slow soak, so maybe the plants aren’t getting as much water as I think. Or maybe we’ve got a case of something else?

The first Brandywine from our Mississippi plants was this deep red and so tasty with basil from the garden (and mozzarella from the store):

tomato caprese 2017

The glut is starting

vegetable harvest july 21 2017To sum it up briefly: We can’t keep up with the zucchini. Too hot to do much baking! When we’ve had enough of kale salad, the greens are becoming pesto. There’s been more than enough for that. This evening marked our first harvest of beans, and the Sungold tomatoes are kicking off the tomato season. We harvested the first two three days ago and have had a few more since then. At least we’ll soon be able to use up cucumbers by making gazpacho.

The next debate for the garden: what to plant where the peas have been? A fall crop of peas? Try again with beets? Find a zucchini plant in the clearance section at a garden center and have a fall crop?

Feel free to weigh in.